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Biscuit Tins
 
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  Themes Homepage > Between the Wars
 
Biscuit Tins
Between the Wars

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Many of the smaller companies never resumed fancy tin production after the First World War and it wasn't until 1922 that Huntley & Palmers returned to normal production. Over the next decade the new Christmas tins were at their most fanciful and included a garden roller, a penny-in-the-slot machine, a hand camera and a Huntley & Palmers delivery van.
Perambulator, 1930
Perambulator, 1930
 
Chinese Vase, 1928
Chinese Vase, 1928
Copies of Antiques and Fine Art
As the middle classes were becoming wealthier and better-educated, Huntley & Palmers created tins which copied fine art objects. These included Chinese Vases and Royal Doulton pottery and enabled the middle classes to fulfill aspirations of ownership when they would never have been able to afford the original object.
 

Changes to Huntley, Boorne and Stevens
In 1918 Huntley, Boorne & Stevens became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Huntley & Palmers. When His Royal Highness, the Prince of Wales, visited the Huntley & Palmers factory in June 1926, a tour around Huntley, Boorne and Stevens was included.
Prince of Wales visit, 1926
Prince of Wales visit, 1926
 
The Winner, late 1930s
The Winner, late 1930s

A Peek Frean Tin
In 1921 Huntley & Palmers joined with Peek Frean to form Associated Biscuit Manufacturers Ltd. Peek Frean also made fancy biscuit tins and this tin was issued by them in 1935. The outer drum illustrates a grandstand and racegoers and the inner revolving drum illustrates horses. The biscuits were contained inside the inner drum.
 

Change in Designs
From the late 1920s increased mechanization and higher wages led to tins that were much simpler in shape and fewer of the ornate designs were manufactured. The newer tins were decorated with images and photographs of objects or people, in particular the Royal Family.
Memories of designing tins ,1996
Memories of designing tins ,1996
 
Edward VIII Coronation Tin, 1937
Edward VIII Coronation Tin, 1937

Edward VIII
This tin was made as a special order in preparation for the celebration of King Edward VIII's coronation. When Edward abdicated the throne to marry the American divorcée, Wallis Simpson, production of the tin was cancelled.
 
 
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  Themes Homepage > Between the Wars
 
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